School places: A primary and secondary concern

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NATIONAL OFFER DAY: Secondary School decision is an important milestone for every child 

YESTERDAY was an important day for thousands of parents and children across Oldham.

‘National Offer Day’, as it is now known, is when mums and dads find out which school their child will be starting their secondary education at next September.

In our borough, like everywhere else, we’ve seen a significant increase in the numbers of school age children needing places in recent years.

We take our responsibility to ensure that each child gets a school place very seriously, but it is no easy task.

Putting aside the reality that it is never possible to grant every parent’s preference, this legal duty (as the cross-party Local Government Association has warned this week) could soon become “undeliverable” in many areas.

Significant population growth means many secondary schools are now already at or above capacity nationwide.

Last year local authorities had to provide around 2.75m secondary school places, but that is set to rise to 3.28m by 2024. These are huge numbers and pressures.

Under the Government’s rules, all new schools to help cope with this demand must be “free schools”, created outside of local authority control.

And – to be clear – we are fully committed to working with Vicky Beer, the Regional Schools Commissioner for Lancashire and West Yorkshire, to help to find good quality local sponsors for new schools in our area.

But I also agree with the LGA’s call for councils themselves to be able to open new schools, and to require academies to expand to meet local demand, where necessary.

There are now fewer and fewer schools under the direct control of councils.  It’s surely common sense that local authorities are well placed to act to ensure school places can be created on time – and in the right places. If we are to be tasked with ensuring sufficient school places we need to have more flexibility and influence in the system to have any realistic prospect of delivering that capacity.

Here in Oldham we’ve been seeing a significant increase in demand for places for some time and we have taken the necessary actions.

First, we put a better forecasting method in place looking at all available data on births, housing and new arrivals so we can plan ahead.

Secondly, we got on with an expansion programme to provide extra capacity. That includes plans to boost primary places with a new three-form entry school on the former Grange School site, plus the expansion of places in Failsworth, Hollinwood and Lees.

Last week we also saw planning approval granted for a new Saddleworth School that will increase pupil numbers from 1,350 to 1,500 – and plans are also about to go out to statutory consultation to double the capacity at Greenfield primary with a new build two-form entry school.

So, how have we done this year with the provision of secondary school places?

Out of 3,468 applications received some 2,773 (80 per cent) of applicants got their first-choice school preference and, in total, 93 per cent of all applicants got one of their first three (from six) choices.

These figures are not unusual and pretty static as a trend. The number of parents applying for certain local secondary schools as their first choice exceeds the number of pupils they can take every year.

I’ve said from the outset that the education and skills offer here in the borough is a key focus for my leadership, and every bit as vital to our future as physical regeneration.

So I was interested this week when Michael Wilshaw, Ofsted’s chief inspector of schools, warned Greater Manchester that the region’s poor performing secondaries could “choke” the Northern Powerhouse vision.

I do hope that this was at least a recognition that local authorities need to have a strong role in school improvement, whatever the type of school, because we actually have less influence than ever before.

This is not about councils wanting to directly control academies or free schools, we know that’s not going to happen, but it is about being able to intervene for the good of local communities when schools are not performing.

It cannot be right that all the responsibility for performance can fall upon councils without us having the appropriate powers to act.

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COMMISSION: Estelle Morris chaired the OESC which delivered its vital report in January.

I welcome the calls now for discussion about us having a specific GM Schools Commissioner who would work with a Further Education Commissioner to give more focus on local need and deliver closer coordination between schools and post-16 education.

We are, of course, doing everything we can to meet the challenge of ensuring no child is without a school place in Oldham – but that’s only part of the battle.

The bigger picture is to implement the recommendations of the Oldham Education and Skills Commission report so that every child can not just get a place, but can get one at a ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’ local school – and have the best chance of fulfilling their full potential.

Jean

Taking Charge Together – and getting the Right Start

IT’S BEEN a really important week in terms of our latest plans to improve local health and tackle inequalities.

Firstly we have seen the launch of a vital new campaign – Taking Charge Together – with partners across Greater Manchester.

This will shape health and social care plans across our region for the next five years.

As you may already know, the ten local authorities are now in charge of the £6bn to be spent on health and social care as part of the devolution deal with Central Government.

This is a fantastic opportunity to make our own decisions about the services we deliver and need.

Our shared goal is to see the fastest improvement to health, wealth and wellbeing of the 2.8milion people living here, but to do that we need to find solutions together.

Your opinion and input really matters on this, so I’d urge you to please do your bit by helping us get a better understanding about what helps or stops you from making important choices about your own health.

Please watch the video at the top of this blog to find out more and then visit www.takingchargetogether.org.uk to fill in a quick snapshot survey for us.

Any information you give is confidential and you can even select a ‘Rather not say’ option if you prefer not to answer a particular question.

Next month we will also be hosting a community roadshow event in Oldham with Key 103 on March 7 on Albion Street (outside Tommyfield Market Hall) from 10am to 4pm. More details about this will follow soon in local media and all our usual channels.

Secondly this week, we’ve also signed a deal with Bridgewater Community Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust to deliver services in our 16 children’s centres plus school nursing, health visiting and a family nurse partnership.

This three-year contract starts on April 1 and will be part of Right Start: an innovative new service which we’ve just launched. This will be working with families all the way through pregnancy and until a child starts school.

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DEAL: Signing on the dotted line with Colin Scales, Chief Executive of Bridgewater Community Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

It’s a joined-up approach to these services and the realisation of a vision we’ve been working towards for some time.

Right Start will make it easier for families to contact professionals at every stage of their child’s development and will offer a service that is personal and tailored to their needs.

It’s about having a single service to help us to realise that ambition – recently referred to in the Oldham Education and Skills Commission report – of making sure all our children are ‘school ready’ and developing well.

Bridgewater will also be providing school nursing and oral health services – all supported by an integrated digital care record which will share information across services.

It’s an exciting development and part of that wider vision to reduce health inequalities, which is something we can all play a part in.

Finally – and also looking to the future – I will be going on-site at the Old Town Hall development to check on progress later this week.

It’s been quite a while since I’ve been in the building so I’m really looking forward to seeing the work that is going on. I will share some photographs, updates and thoughts with you all on that next week.

Jean

Oldham moving up a gear

JEANAUDIIt’s been a good week for Oldham with the news that we’ve signed another major inward investment deal – bringing yet more jobs and money to the local economy.

Landmark deals like this one are usually the result of considerable time and effort by officers and this one is no exception.

Last year the Jardine Motors Group, a major Audi dealership, approached us about the availability of the old Westhulme Hospital site off Chadderton Way.

They had identified it as a perfect fit for their plans to build a 17-car showroom with a 24-bay service workshop and to create a hub that can support all of their existing businesses across the region.

The site was owned by the NHS Trust and we knew it was surplus to requirements so officers in our regeneration team set to work with them to see what could be done.

The upshot – subject to planning permission – would be a new Audi dealership that will represent an investment of around £8 million into the borough.

Not only does that mean another major brand has chosen to have a presence in Oldham, it’s also good news in so many other ways.

It will mean the creation of around 87 new skilled jobs and Jardine have also signed up to our Get Oldham Working campaign which means they’ve committed to working alongside our colleges and supply chains to create even more new local opportunities.

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MAJOR DEAL: Artist’s impression of the proposed Audi dealership off Chadderton Way.

That makes this a ‘win win’ for everyone – and every extra bit of business rates income will, of course, also help the council in the face of our ongoing financial pressures.

That is timely as Monday saw the release of the final Local Government finance settlement, which is official confirmation of exactly what funding we will get from Government for the 2016/7 financial year.

Tomorrow night (Thursday) we will be taking the final proposed tranche of cuts for that year of around £16.1m to Cabinet.

Getting to this stage has meant making a series of tough decisions: the vast majority of which neither myself nor my colleagues would willingly want to make.

Part of the final proposals also mean that your Council Tax will increase next year.

Two per cent of that rise is because the Government – by its own admission – simply isn’t giving us enough to help tackle the spiralling costs in social care.

Their solution to this has been to conveniently give all councils a new option to put their Council Tax up by 2 per cent to fund that gap (it doesn’t do that at all, by the way).

I understand every Greater Manchester council – like the vast majority across the country – will be taking this option, but it is still a bitter pill.

Essentially the Government is passing the blame for this funding cut and problem down to us – and then leaving us to pass it on to your bottom line.

Since 2009 we’ve now had to find a total of £176 million in cuts from our budget and February has become a time of year that we all dread.

The decisions get harder each time and so, undeniably, does the impact on residents and your frontline services.

Our final proposals will go next to Full Council (Budget) on Wednesday, February 24, for approval.

The meeting will, as usual, be broadcast live on our website, but I can’t promise it will make for happy viewing(!).

Jean

The work goes on…

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NEW LEADER: Councillor Jean Stretton has replaced Jim McMahon as Oldham Council Leader

WELCOME to my first-ever blog as Oldham Council Leader – and thank you all for the many good wishes and congratulation messages that I have received.

I’m honoured to be following Jim McMahon in this role and – like him – I’ll be writing a blog each week.

I wanted this job because Oldham is in my heart and it’s in my blood.

I was born here, brought up here and have lived here most of my life.

As I explained in my first speech as Leader to Full Council last week, I’m very proud of the forward strides we have made since 2011 – and that work goes on.

There’ll be no lowering of ambitions, no slackening of effort and no settling for second best while I am at the helm in Oldham.

People want and deserve our long-standing regeneration schemes and these will continue.

But I will also be giving more focus to social regeneration: not just bricks and mortar.

A major priority in that respect is my pledge to ensure the Oldham Education and Skills Commission report recommendations are implemented.

Too many young people don’t get to reach their full potential because some of our schools are not yet up to scratch.

I’ve been asked what happens next.

Well, that document won’t be sitting on a shelf gathering dust – I won’t allow it.

Cabinet has already committed £1m to take this work forward and a meeting later this week will discuss the structure and governance arrangements that we will need to get cracking.

Parents and education partners will all want to see us get on with this work quickly.

You can rest assured I will be taking a keen interest in this – and I have high expectations of the difference that we can make by working together with those partners.

Jean

New Year Leader’s Message – 2016

newyear2016I’D LIKE TO wish all our residents a ‘Happy New Year’ for the last time in my capacity as Oldham Council Leader.

Later this month I’ll be stepping down to focus on my new role as the MP for Oldham West and Royton, but this does not mean I am moving on.

Instead I see this as ‘stepping up’ to represent the borough in a different way – championing your interests at Westminster, where we need a strong voice now more than ever.

I’ve also agreed to take on a new ambassadorial role to continue giving leadership on the regeneration programme here which will be entering a very exciting period in 2016.

We’ve had plenty of milestones in the last year with the opening of new Leisure Centres in Oldham and Royton, the North Stand at Oldham Athletic, FCHO’s new headquarters on Union Street, plus the blossoming of new businesses and creative ventures in the Independent Quarter, and much more.

In the coming months you’ll continue to see even further progress on projects that are there to ensure Oldham – and above all, its people – can prosper.

The developments I just mentioned are important parts of our ‘invest to grow’ programme of physical regeneration, but none are more symbolic of our aspirations than the Old Town Hall.

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FLAGSHIP: Contractors working to transform the Old Town Hall.

This is our flagship scheme and the sense of anticipation is growing with every new steel strut, column and window.

When work to rejuvenate this venue is complete, when families are queuing to end a decade-long wait for cinema tickets, when doors open at its six new restaurants, and when the first cappuccinos are frothed for visitors to the adjacent Parliament Square, it will be a hugely-significant moment for Oldham.

This is a development to put the town centre back on the map: to reawaken this grand old building and its surrounds and restore it to its rightful place as a symbol of civic pride.

That will be a powerful moment in 2016, but I know it really only marks the end of the beginning of the longer journey that lies ahead.

Much remains to be done because we’re still facing a range of challenges to our future prosperity and wellbeing.

In 2015 at Oldham Council we finalised the process of finding £35m in cuts for our 2015/6 budget and then almost immediately set about finding a further £18m of savings for 2016/7. We know these cuts are having a real impact on residents and services – and our partners – despite our determination to continue delivering and supporting people.

BudgetInfog1The cuts – more than £200 million since 2010 – have been accompanied by rising demand for help from our most vulnerable residents and will be further compounded by new Government plans to remove central funding that will effectively leave towns like ours to ‘sink or swim’ on our own resources.

That’s why so much hard work has already being going on in key projects that aren’t about bricks and mortar, but about social regeneration.

When I say that I’m thinking of schemes like Get Oldham Working, which beat its original target to create 2,015 jobs, apprenticeship and traineeships with nine months to spare this year.

I’m also thinking about the introduction of the Living Wage for council staff, the new Fair Employment Charter, which is designed to tackle issues like ‘zero hour’ contracts, and our work to put social value – ensuring contractors support our local economy – at the heart of every pound we spend.

Another huge challenge is providing people with homes and good places to live. This year we began our licensing scheme for private landlords to stamp out the letting of poor quality accommodation, and continued to fight fuel poverty through projects like Warm Homes Oldham, from which around 2,000 homes have benefited.

Construction has also begun on new homes at sites across the borough and we’ve introduced a Green Dividend scheme to help fund tree planting and other projects to make neighbourhoods better places to live.

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ESTELLE MORRIS: Launching the Oldham Education and Skills Commission at Stoneleigh Primary School.

Crucially, the focus will turn to our future – young people and education – later this month when the Oldham Education and Skills Commission (OESC) delivers its landmark report.

We’re working hard to deliver better facilities like the new Hollinwood Academy, Saddleworth School and the new three form entry primary school currently under construction on the former Grange site, but education isn’t just about an inspiring learning environment: it’s about every child getting the best chance to fulfil their potential.

We know we can – and must – do better here because successful schools and training underpins all our ambitions to become a place where people want to live and work.

The new OESC report will clearly set out the challenge that lies ahead: how to ensure our young people are school ready, work ready and life ready and we all have a part to play in that.

JimMcMahonOBEFinally, I give you my word that as an MP I will be retaining as close an interest as ever in our progress on education and many other areas – including to ensure that we benefit fairly from devolution to Greater Manchester.

I’m determined to continue to help drive things forward in our borough and make sure that we continue to innovate and change so we can deliver for tomorrow’s generation.

Councillor Jim McMahon OBE
Leader of Oldham Council
MP for Oldham West and Royton

Show there is a GM difference on Sunday trading

SUNDAY TRADING: Should opening hours be extended on ‘the day of rest’?
SUNDAY TRADING: Should opening hours extend on ‘the day of rest’?

SUNDAY IS a special day for the British public.

Although the day of rest had its origins in religion many people with no creed at all greatly value the time they get to spend with their families – or simply to relax away from the pressures of work.

The devolution of Sunday trading powers was a surprise to those of us involved in Greater Manchester’s deal with government.

We hadn’t asked for it and therefore we couldn’t carry out any kind of local consultation about how the power might be used before the announcement came.

With the devolution machine moving quickly the range of powers, responsibilities and the very important fair funding settlement hasn’t been clearly laid out.

The speed and nature of devolution locally has also led many people to ask who is making these decisions and what say do they actually have in it?

Extending Sunday trading opening times has the potential to be contentious even though, by and large, it has not been much of an issue over the last decade.

When council leaders met to discuss the proposed devolution of Sunday trading there wasn’t a big appetite for change, but there was an agreement that the economic case must be clearly demonstrated: as well as taking into account the wide range of views for and against.

This could be a good opportunity for Greater Manchester to show that there is a real difference when powers are devolved away from Whitehall to a more local level.

So what might that difference be?

Well, GM has already begun the process of commissioning independent research to explore the economic case of extended Sunday trading. It would have made sense for this to be a wider review from the outset, but it still isn’t too late to build on this.

There’s a chance the review will simply conclude that there isn’t a compelling economic argument to extend trading hours at all. In which case I suspect the matter won’t go any further.

But there is also a chance, of course, that the review will suggest there are economic benefits and those need to be considered.

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WEEKEND: Do we really want shopping to become an almost 24/7 habit?

The GM difference, however, must be that we fully consider community, society and the rights of workers in this debate. This is not part of the assessment remit so far, but it simply cannot be ignored.

Usdaw, the respected trade union which represents many shopworkers the length and breadth of the country, is keen to make sure that those people working in shops have a voice in the debate too.

They have carried out important surveys which show the strength of feeling of many staff who don’t want to be pressured into working hours which will further impact on family life.

There’s a real opportunity here for Greater Manchester to show that there is a positive difference in how we tackle important issues and decisions like this.

Why don’t we set up a GM Sunday Trading Commission with representation from all of those who are affected by it? By including civil society, religious groups, trade unions and other retailers – like convenience store operators – we would have a much more active and representative debate: and better decision making.

We can’t go on repeating the mistakes already made by a disconnected – and often disinterested – Whitehall.

We can and must show that we will involve all those affected by the decisions we take and will give people a genuine voice in debates like this.

That should be the GM difference.

Thanks for listening,

Jim

Courting controversy: Is there a Northern Powerhouse difference?

THE BENCH: Oldham Magistrates Court could close under the proposals.
THE BENCH: Oldham Magistrates Court could close under the proposals from the Ministry of Justice… 

PUBLIC sector cuts are biting and hurting the very fabric of our community.

When all that drives decisions is the rush to cut costs there will be consequences for residents and other public services.

Consultation has now ended on the Government’s proposals to close 91 courts and merge a further 31 across England and Wales.

This includes plans to close both Oldham Magistrates Court and Oldham County Court.

The rationale is narrow and focused solely on the departmental budget of the Ministry of Justice with little or no thought given to the knock-on effects this will have.

Firstly, access to justice and the right to be judged by our peers is a fundamental right of British citizens.

The more that the legal system removes itself from the communities it is there to serve the less likely you will be judged by your peers.

Secondly, the cost of our justice system is not met solely by the Ministry of Justice.

The judges and courts might be the supporting infrastructure but the impact is far wider.

For the police and local councils supporting victims, giving evidence and delivering well-informed and fairly balanced verdicts, the costs are considerable.

THE END? Oldham County Court is also under threat.
JUSTICE: Oldham County Court is also under threat.

Relocating the court from Oldham to Tameside or Manchester adds significant travel and waiting times.

This is not free time but a real cost to the public purse. It also means officers will be tied up longer meaning either more resources will be required or cases and investigations backlog – or even worse cases begin to collapse.

Looking at a judicial system solely from an estates point of view is wrong and misjudged.

Group Leaders in Oldham across all political parties have come together to fight the proposal.

We don’t believe that closing the two courts has been properly considered and of course we have an eye on the wider economic impact: the loss of public facilities, the loss of footfall in the town centre and the potential that some legal firms may also choose to relocate.

We know more than most about the pressures to balance your books and that’s why we offered a counter proposal, which you can read here.  

By bringing together the County and Magistrates courts into one building they can reduce operating costs and dispose of the redundant building but continue to offer access to justice to our communities.

We hope this plan is considered properly, but I fear it may not be.

Will a Whitehall official really take the time to look at a little town like Oldham?

Will we get lost in the consultation that covers the whole of England and Wales?

If the consultation is a genuine one then our counter proposal should hold weight.

We aren’t being stubborn here – we are showing maturity.

There is a wider question that in the new ‘Northern Powerhouse’ surely we locally should be making these decisions, not someone locked away in Whitehall?

Devolution can only work if it rests on strong foundations. With the cuts coming much quicker than the cash promised through devolution the very foundations it relies upon may quickly give way.

Is there a Northern Powerhouse difference?

The jury is well and truly out!

Thanks for listening,

Jim

Old Friends returning – New friends found

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SMOKIN’: The newly-opened Smoke Yard restaurant on  Church Terrace, just opposite the Old Town Hall, is run by Ata Mubeen and Luke Rafferty who were schoolmates at St Augustine’s  

OLDHAM town centre is continuing to grow in confidence with an impressive and growing range of new shops, restaurants and attractions for people of all ages.

If Marks & Spencer signing the deal to come to Oldham last November was a symbolic pointer towards a brighter future then T J Hughes’ welcome return is another big boost to our morale.

For too long local people could only watch on helplessly in recent times as the town centre they knew started to change and the doom and gloom of decline set in.

As with many other towns, the new world of online retail, changing shopping habits  and national economic pressures meant far too many stores were closing and leaving large gaps on our High Street.

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NEW LIFE: Renovated shops on Yorkshire Street

I’m not trying to suggest that Oldham is sorted yet – not at all – but I do think there is enough happening now to give us all grounds for hope.

This all makes me think back to the time when I visited a small town on holiday and started speaking enthusiastically about it to a local resident.

I began the conversation by saying how envious I was of them having the view they enjoyed every time they open their front door.

But the conversation quickly turned into a busman’s holiday as he began telling me all the problems he perceived with the place: from bins not being emptied to the water charges soon to be introduced.

I have the same perspective problem myself at times; and perhaps more than most given the job I do.

I too tend to notice the shop that has closed, rather than the surrounding units which are open. I also tend to notice the broken paving slabs, not the metres of perfectly finished surface I’ve just unconsciously strolled across.

Taking time to pause and reflect on that can be good for the soul. It gives you a clearer sense of perspective about what is good and clarity about what actually needs to improve.

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BACK: T J Hughes has re-opened in Oldham

Last week I joined the hundreds of folk who visited the re-opened TJ Hughes and – yes, after leaving with the mandatory Vax Carpet Cleaner (!) – thought to myself that I hadn’t seen the shopping centre feel that busy for a long time.

TJ’s are also not alone in showing faith is what is now happening in our town centre.

We’ve recently welcomed the likes of the Entertainer Toy Store, Warren James Jewellery, Pep & Co and Ethel Austin in joining our line-up of main brand shops – and that’s as well as fantastic new independent retailers such as Suits Scoots and Boots.

The thing that excites me most though is when Oldhamers themselves set up shop here.

They know more than most people about our town centre and clearly many are recognising that something really positive is happening.

Right now we have potential clients literally queuing up for assistance to join the Independent Quarter – to the extent that we need extra staff just to deal with the enquiries and grant support.

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HOT: Jack’s Smokehouse is proving popular on Yorkshire Street

Newly-opened restaurants like Jack’s Smokehouse and The Smoke Yard are the latest additions heading what is going to be an impressive list of people who believe that now is the time to invest here.

I can also tell you that ahead of the opening next year of the Old Town Hall with its seven cinema screens we’re getting some fantastic interest from national and local restaurant operators. Watch this space…

What I hope everyone will do in the meantime is to continue to get behind Oldham town centre and back it: from our indoor market with over 100 stalls, to the traditional outdoor market – and from our High Street to our Independent Quarter. And when people moan to you that “there’s nowt in Oldham”, please challenge them back.

We’ve already got big names like Debenhams, Next, River Island, H&M, BHS and others – and we’re soon to welcome a new M&S.

The town centre is now clean and well cared for, it has improved facilities like our play area where you can spend family time – oh, plus up to three hours of free parking on weekends – so why not give us a go?

Thanks for listening,

Jim

Fostering: Fantastic people – great rewards

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FOSTER CARE: Could you provide a young person with a supportive family environment?

I HAVE spent some of this week down in Brighton at the Labour Party Conference, but my thoughts are never far from Oldham.

One of the biggest challenges we face in the borough is encouraging residents to become foster carers and open up their homes.

It is a serious struggle – especially in the case of teenagers – to find those people who can play a vital role in helping young people to get a stable life, achieve the best they can at school and prepare them for adulthood.

It requires foster carers who are prepared to get involved in the emotional development of young people – which can bring its own trials and tribulations – but the rewards for doing it can also be absolutely fantastic.

I’ve been fortunate enough to have met some of the many inspiring and proud people that already do this work in Oldham.

They set a fantastic example and make a great contribution to our communities which is why this week I asked our Fostering Team to ‘guest blog’ and explain more about fostering and the opportunities on offer…

Oldham Council believes that the best place for children to live is with their own family. Sadly for some children, this isn’t possible.

When a child cannot live at home, the next best alternative is usually for them to live in a foster family.

Fostering is caring for someone else’s child in your home and doing all the things any good parent would do including making sure their health is good, helping them do well at school, and to maintain links with their family and friends.

Here in Oldham we have more than 140 households that care for around 230 children and young people, each doing a fantastic job. However, our greatest challenge is finding foster families for teenagers and children with complex needs. Sadly some of these children live in residential homes or out of borough in independent foster families, away from family and friends.

In order to bring these children back into the borough we have developed a new scheme called One2One fostering. This new service is for children or young people who have experienced significant neglect or trauma; and who are in need of specialist foster care.

One2One fostering provides a child or young person with a supportive family where they can build a trusting relationship with a foster carer whilst they receive therapy to help them to overcome traumatic experiences.

This is where we need your help and support. Maybe you have been considering fostering for some time, or know others who are interested. Equally, you may have not given the matter any thought – but please do so now.

Fosters carers in Oldham consistently tell us that fostering is life changing, not just for the child or young person but for themselves too.

Foster3Here’s what local carers Danny and Marie (pictured right) have to say:

“Rather than fostering younger children we wanted to foster teenagers. Teenagers are at the most important phase of their emotional and educational development. This is a traditionally tough time for them, but more so for those in care.

“The most rewarding experience so far has been helping a teenage girl to realise her full potential. She was mixing with the wrong group of peers and she was regularly excluded from school. After spending some time with her we discovered that she was incredibly bright and with support and a lot of determination she went from achieving U grades to A’s and B’s.

“Fostering is a vital part of society and it feels good to be part of it and give something back to your community. We wouldn’t change it for the world.”

You don’t need specialist qualifications to foster. Life experience and personal qualities can make a huge difference to a young person. All we ask is that you are aged over 21 and have room in your home.

Our team works extremely hard to make sure all our carers receive specialist training and support, plus a generous financial package of up to £29,000 per year.

If you would like to find out more, call 0161 770 6600 or go to http://www.oldham.gov.uk/fostering

Finally, we want to give a quick mention to our adoption team who recently received ‘Good’ in our Ofsted inspection.

Monday 19 October marks the start of National Adoption Week and we would like to hear from anyone interested in adopting older children, brothers and sisters or children with additional needs. Sadly, there is a shortage of adoptive parents coming forward for these children.

During National Adoption Week local authorities – and everyone who works in adoption – will be working together to highlight the plight of these vulnerable children and to help them find forever families.

If you could offer that gift to someone then please call 0161 770 6605 or go to www.oldham.gov.uk/adoption

Thanks for listening,

Jim

Heritage: A nod to our past

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CHARACTER: Buildings like the Oldham Lyceum (above) are what gives a town centre a unique identity.

I HAVE written several blogs about the importance of valuing our heritage but this week the topic merits special attention.

On Monday night, Cabinet agreed to a new phased programme over 10 years to deliver our commitments to a new Heritage Centre and Coliseum Theatre – and to go much further and ensure a more secure future for several important heritage buildings in the town centre. Let me explain why… 

I will never forget the time a few years back when I first walked around the interior of the Old Town Hall.

The building had simply gone too far. The deterioration over the past two decades had caught up with it and the mixture of damp and dry rot had eaten through most of it.

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CREST: A wonderful artefact from the Old Town Hall

Finding a modern day use to save that building has been no mean feat. It required vision, determination and a strong stomach to say the least.

As you’d expect I’ve made it my business since then to fully understand all the land and property assets owned by the council and then to look at their long-term future: both in terms of what each is used for and the current condition and any repairs that might be required.

I’ve paid particular attention to the buildings in Oldham town centre because – if you haven’t gathered this by now – we are determined to transform it into a place we can all be truly proud of.

Heritage isn’t just about bricks and mortar, it is about culture and identity; people and society.

Buildings are just an articulation of that but they are important because long after their uses have changed and people have moved on they still tell a story: a nod to our past, if you like.

Walking around the town centre you find that some of our best buildings are just self-selecting. They stand prominently. They demand attention.

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GEM: The old library building, Union Street 

That’s why it is vital that in developing our flagship Heritage Centre we will also secure the future of the Grade II-listed Old Gallery on Union Street.

In finding a new use for it, that also has the consequence of leaving the Old Post (and Telegraph) Office, the former museum, empty.

And while thinking about future uses it became clear to me that we need to think and plan differently. 

If the experience with the Old Town Hall has taught me anything it is that the cost of doing nothing is very expensive. Eventually you are forced to take action and the longer that takes the more expensive it will be to put it right, or to demolish.

We’ve now outlined a list of the heritage buildings we want to help secure the future of and I personally see these as essential if we are to have the town centre we aspire to have.

What makes Oldham stand out is that it is Oldham.

We don’t want or need an ‘off the shelf’ out of town retail park that feels like a chicken shed to replace our town centre. We want character and experience that gives people a reason to keep coming back.

We have now agreed that will we be paying particular attention to the following buildings:

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Oldham Lyceum;

Old Bank at Mumps;

Former Post Office and museum, Union Street;

Conservative Club, Union Street;

Masonic Hall, Union Street;

The Prudential Building, Union Street (pictured right);

The Town Centre Conservation Area – which includes the Parish Church and War Memorial.

In deciding to expand the Heritage Centre and Coliseum Theatre project to include a vision for our other heritage buildings, I hope the people of Oldham can see that we are serious about our obligations.

We are committed to making sure our future is built on solid foundations; our past.

Thanks for listening,

Jim