An economy that works for everyone

dpd
SPECIAL DELIVERY: The new DPD depot set to bring 350 new jobs to the borough

I PROMISED to blog more about our key priorities in the years ahead – as outlined in my recent Annual Report to Full Council.

As I said last week, Oldham only succeeds when we all make our own efforts towards making it a better place – we can only build a better borough together.

That’s the spirit of co-operative working, but what does it really mean and how does it work in practice?

Put simply, it means everyone with a vested interest in a scheme contributes their own ‘bit’ towards making it a reality, whatever that might be.

And that involves all of us – not just public sector partners and investors putting in funding or sharing resources – but also residents doing simple but important things, like getting behind a plan, being an ambassador for it and using a new facility when it is built.

At the heart of this co-operative work lies our drive to create a strong economy here – and a place that we can all be proud of.

For Oldham Council that means a clear commitment from us to continuing to work hard to attract outside investment.

We’re still having good success on that front. Take last week’s deal for a new DPD Depot at Chadderton last week creating up to 350 new local jobs, for example.

lidl
LIDL: New Royton store created 40 new jobs this month

It’s a commitment from us that the regeneration of our town and district centres – like the new Lidl which opened in Royton this month – will go on and that we’ll carry on striving to build a more balanced and stronger economy that works for everyone.

The Old Town Hall will open on October 21 and that’s a flagship project that makes a clear statement about where we are heading as a place.

It says everything about our intent to have a thriving and confident Oldham town centre where families and communities can enjoy quality time. And it’s about banishing those bad old days when the ‘Wild West’ culture of cheap booze offers around Yorkshire Street blighted our reputation.

But as I’ve outlined in earlier blogs, the Old Town Hall will be just the heartbeat of that new town centre and there will be other important developments taking shape around it.

Funding is in place now for our new Arts & Heritage Centre in the old library on Union Street, for example, and next year we can lay the foundations on the Prince’s Gate scheme, including that much-awaited Marks & Spencer store.

You should also have noticed major improvement works going on to highways and pedestrian areas around the town centre.

That’s not just our new Parliament Square, it’s the ongoing upgrades to Yorkshire Street and the Campus Oldham part of town, along the King Street corridor linking Oldham College, the new Oldham Leisure Centre and Oldham Sixth Form College.

All of this is being done to improve the experience for motorists, cyclists, shoppers, visitors, residents and business.

The progress on schemes like this – and the new Maggie’s Cancer Care Centre at the Royal Oldham Hospital – is helping to move Oldham to the next level with better opportunities and jobs and one we can finally market as a visitor destination in its own right.

We’ve worked with so many partners on those schemes I’ve just mentioned: including the Heritage Lottery Fund, the Stoller Trust, Arts Council England, NHS Oldham, Marks & Spencer, Transport for Greater Manchester and the GMCA, to name just a few.

But successful co-operative working also works at all ends of the spectrum – and it’s just as important when it delivers great outcomes at a smaller level.

oldhams-independent-quarter-sqA shining example of that is the Independent Quarter.

Doing our bit as the local authority has been to put up a £1m package of comprehensive support to help existing or start-up businesses.

For others, their bit as traders has been to put life savings, hard graft and vision into a new venture, or as residents it’s been just to go and use these new shops and support the traders in their new home.

The result to date is that we have seen 30 new specialist traders move in, plus three new quality restaurants and 50 buildings refurbished.

We’ve got a waiting list of applications and people wanting to relocate there – including a new Digital Enterprise Hub that will help new enterprises grow across the digital, technology and creative sectors.

Between all of us we’re transforming what was a run-down area strewn with vacant units into a place that is changing by the day, providing a specialist offer for customers and businesses, creating new jobs and blossoming in confidence.

I believe it could well rank as the best £1 million this local authority has ever spent – and that’s because other people have bought into the vision and backed it.

That is very powerful. That’s the difference we can make together. That’s an economy that works for everyone.

Next week I’ll be explaining the growing importance of social regeneration for this administration.

These are existing and new schemes that are just as important as new facilities and buildings to people.

We want to restore pride – not just in Oldham as a place – but also in people and communities by helping to change their daily lives for the better and improve their prospects.

Above all, it’s about ensuring that, in Oldham, nobody is left behind.

Jean

History in the making: heritage in our hearts

Library1IT’S GREAT to be able to report that the full funding package is now in place for the Oldham Arts and Heritage Centre.
 
As a Co-operative Council partnerships across all sectors are vital to our borough’s future and this regeneration scheme is a great example of that.
 
Oldham Council has committed £8m in funding to this project and we have now secured a Heritage Lottery Fund grant of £3.37m – plus an incredible donation from Sir Norman Stoller of £4m.
 
This means funding for this phase is complete and we can now get on with delivering this exciting vision.
 
The Arts and Heritage Centre is a vital project that will improve the town centre’s cultural offer – and it underlines our determination to put heritage at the heart of our regeneration programme.
 
It’s important that future generations will have the chance to go and visit a facility where they can be inspired and learn more about our borough’s past.
This new centre will tell that story.
 
From the Industrial Revolution and our time as the cotton spinning capital of the world right up to the present day, it will use objects, storyboards, installations, media and our museum and archives collections to being that journey to life in an informative and engaging way.
 
The project will also see a new lease of life given to the grade II-listed former Library building on Union Street, which is crucial.
 
We’re acutely aware of the need to bring empty buildings back into use within the town centre conservation area.
 
We are already working hard to support existing and new businesses into the area, but there are clear challenges in getting developers interested in coming forward with solutions for larger and older buildings like this one.
 
This venue will now undergo restoration work and be fully returned to public access as the new home to our heritage showcase with gallery spaces, public research rooms and meeting spaces.
 
It will also have new educational facilities that will include opportunities for people to volunteer and train, and join in local engagement and outreach programmes. The former lecture hall will also become a performance studio space for local groups.
 
Library2The brilliant old photo (above) shows the finishing touches being put to the building just prior to its opening.
 
You can also see a poster (below right) which advertises the library’s grand event on August 1, 1883, when it was opened by Sir John Lubbock MP accompanied by a large party of fellow MPs, three Dukes, two Earls and a Marquis.
 
I have no idea yet exactly who will open the new centre – work starts on-site early next year – but a clear early candidate to do that has to be Sir Norman Stoller.
 
His philanthropy continues to astound us and we are unbelievably fortunate to have his generosity continuing to create an incredible legacy for Oldham.
 
Not only is Sir Norman an incredible example to our young people of what you can achieve in life, he is also a magnificent ambassador for the borough.
 
Since establishing The Stoller Charitable Trust in 1982 he has contributed millions of pounds to good causes and in 2014 he added a further £50m worth of shares from his personal investments into the Trust.
 
We simply cannot thank him enough for again sharing in our vision to create something that will have a big impact and benefit to residents and visitors alike.
 
Library3Looking ahead our work continues with Historic England on what possible future uses and funding can be found for other old structures in the town centre.
 
Last October we successfully pushed for the conservation area to be included on their ‘Heritage at Risk ‘register.

That might sound like an odd thing to do on the face of it, but this is actually the best thing we can do to help protect and preserve those assets.
 
It allows us to now access specialist advice and gives us the status required for certain funding sources which would otherwise have been denied to us.
 
Historic England is given targets by Government to help remove areas from the register and to dedicate time and resources to help achieve it. 
 
There are good examples in Oldham already of what can be done.
 
Our Old Town Hall project, for example, is restoring the jewel in our civic crown – and schemes like the renovation of the grade II* George Street Chapel by Age UK show how new uses can be found that align with our wider regeneration plans.
 
I am determined that we don’t repeat the mistakes of the past and ignore these problems.
 
If we don’t act now to explore the possibilities then the future could be grim for many of those buildings – and that’s something we cannot allow to happen.
 
Jean