Trash talk #1PieceofRubbish

I RARELY use the word ‘hate’ – but I make an exception when it comes to street litter.

I hate how litter looks. I hate how it smells and, worst of all, I hate what it says about the place to anyone living there or visiting it.

Whether it’s cigarette butts, empty cans or bottles, carrier bags, chewing gum or fast food cartons, it’s all anti-social.

Most people and businesses take pride in our community, living and operating here without making any mess, but some do not.

I often wonder what it is that makes a person feel it’s okay to just drop something from their hands, to not be bothered to keep hold of rubbish for just a few seconds more, and there’s a lot of research around the psychology of this.

People probably do it because they simply don’t feel responsible for public areas, like streets and parks and they often do it away from their own ‘patch’ – so that their mess simply becomes “someone else’s problem”.

Some people also litter because they believe or know that someone – a local street cleaner or even a good-hearted neighbour – will get it sorted out.

The big problem, of course, is that it you’re in an area where there’s already lots of visible litter, then the temptation to do the same is too much for some.

We know that’s true because if you’re somewhere that looks pristine and litter-free we know you’re far less likely to toss unwanted items to the kerb for sheer fear of embarrassment.

There’s some fantastic work being done around what can be done to tackle littering.

Some looks at how we can ‘nudge’ people to change their behaviour and it’s getting some interesting results.

Hubbub, a charity that creates environmental campaigns with a difference, is one good example.

They set up on a busy London street and tested a whole raft of things to see how it affected littering behaviour. They used ‘voting bins’ for cigarette butts, for example, or chalked around chewing gum litter highlighting the cost of removing each piece (£1.50 as it happens) and had some very encouraging results.

RUTHWe’re looking at ideas like this too and are also throwing our weight behind another campaign thanks to a very persistent and inspiring local lady.

Ruth Major (pictured, right) is retired but is certainly not a person to rest on her laurels.

She has been an ‘anti-littering’ activist for a long time and posts updates as ‘Rubbish Ruth’s Rambles’ on Social Media.

Wherever she goes – and believe me, she seems to get everywhere up and and down the country – Ruth encourages people to join a national campaign asking each resident to pick up at least one piece of rubbish a day.

Just think about that.

The population of Oldham is more than 230,000 people so if each resident did that each day it could make a huge difference.

To get things started this month we’re running a #1PieceofRubbish competition on Twitter.

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Anyone who picks up a piece of litter in Oldham and follows the entry guidelines will be entered into a prize draw and the winner gets a three-month premium all-inclusive membership to Oldham Community Leisure (OCL). You can read all the details here

There’s no limit on how many times you can enter this competition because we want everyone to pick up as many pieces of rubbish as possible.

This campaign isn’t finishing at the end of October either – we’re committed to #1PieceofRubbish for the long haul.

If, like me, you love where you live then you’ll hate litter too – please get involved and do #yourbit.

Jean

Rubbish news is just great!

vfm-59I WANT to talk rubbish news this week – and I don’t mean the ‘fake news’ we’re all hearing so much about at the moment…

As you know, Oldham Council started its new waste collection arrangements in October.

The changes were designed to cut the amount of waste being sent to landfill and to promote more recycling across the borough.

This working pattern is now well-established as the norm and our first set of figures has just landed.

I wanted to share these and also take the opportunity to say thank you to people for ‘doing your bit’ – because this success is down to the effort of residents.

Changes to kerbside collection arrangements are never easy.

It’s the one service that every single household relies upon, so we worked very hard on explaining why we were doing this and how the changes would affect everyone.

tidyoldhamThe first comparable set of data shows that our household recycling rate has gone up significantly.

Comparing the third quarter of 2016 with the same period in 2015 we can see that the amount of household waste being recycled has gone up from 36.8 per cent to 43.6 per cent.

Given current trends we now expect this year’s overall recycling rate to average out somewhere between 45 and 47 per cent, which is really good progress – and it’s all down to you.

The public response to the changes – ordering extra blue, brown and green bins, for example – shows you’ve been recycling more and doing it smarter.

This really matters because our future has to be about less waste and more recycling. The costs to us of disposing of grey bin waste is hundreds of pounds per tonne, whereas we actually get a small income for each tonne that we recycle.

Since announcing that changes were on the way in July, we’ve sent out more than 25,000 recycling bins to local residents. Previously around 15,000 bins were requested over a 12-month period.

We’ve also had more than 1,700 applications for extra grey bins, compared with the 300 we would usually get.

These are requests from households with extra waste that they cannot recycle: such as where more than five people are living in one home, for example, or a household has two or more children in nappies.  Where households can demonstrate a genuine need for an additional bin for waste that cannot be recycled, we will provide an additional bin.

All the information you need about your household waste – including what you can and cannot recycle, and tips to manage your rubbish – can be found on our website here.

doorstep009

Some predicted the adoption of the new collection system would mean a significant rise in fly tipping.

But the fly tipping we all see in local media is not what responsible households dispose of in the bins provided.

I’m pretty sure that the mattresses, the fridges and the sofas that are reported as fly tipped across Oldham would never have fitted into the grey bin anyway(!). The trade waste that gets dumped is also something we are working hard to address.

I understand the misery and blight this kind of dumping causes to lives and communities and you may have seen our latest batch of prosecutions on this last week: all in incidents that happened before the new collection arrangements started.

We’ll be continuing with a ‘zero tolerance’ stance on this kind of behaviour and there’ll be more prosecutions to come, for which we make no apologies.

It’s not Oldham Council that dumps this waste, but it does fall to us to clean it up – and at a cost of almost £1m a year to you, the local taxpayer.  That is £1m that could be spent providing services to residents instead of cleaning up after people who do not respect our neighbourhoods.

It’s your neighbour – be that a home or business nearby – or somebody who has come into your area that dumps the stuff. And that is why we need your help.

If you see anyone fly tipping or dumping waste like this, then please do your bit and let us know using the online form here or by calling 0161 770 2244.

illuminate

Finally, I must take this chance to urge you not to miss out on a fantastic arts festival that we’re hosting in Oldham town centre on Friday this week.

‘Illuminate’ is a family friendly event that will feature carnival performances, a river of illuminated paper lanterns, an illuminated vintage bus, a new youth dance piece, LED electronics workshops by Hack Oldham and much, much more.

Attractions and workshops will be taking place at Oldham Parish Church, Parliament Square and Gallery Oldham from 5pm to 9pm that evening.

giantWe’re also bringing back, by popular demand, the Oldham Giant from the Old Town Hall opening ceremony last year (pictured right) and there will be some amazing 3D projections from Illuminos.

This is the first time we’ve ever held a late-night arts festival in the town centre.

It is going to be spectacular, so read more about it here and, please, help us spread the word amongst your friends and family.

Jean

Three-weekly bins – Why, how and when

Grey bin with bags 2 flippedYOU’VE PROBABLY read by now about plans for a new waste collection system to be introduced across the borough in early October.

Put simply, it means a move from two-weekly to three-weekly collections of your grey, general waste bins – plus other measures to help people recycle.

I must stress that we haven’t done this lightly – and also that we did our research first.

I know kerbside collection is the one service that every single resident relies upon. That means making changes to it is a big deal and that we must get it right.

After weighing up all the options the decision boiled down to some inescapable facts.

At present, the cost to Oldham Council for disposing of grey bin waste comes to hundreds of pounds per tonne. Yet for every tonne we recycle, we actually get a small income.

That means our future simply has to be about less waste and more recycling – which are environmental and economic ‘wins’ for everyone.

The more money that we can save by doing this, the more funds we can then put back into protecting vital frontline services as Government continues to slash our funding.

We’re not unusual in making this change. Across Greater Manchester there is now only Wigan that still has fortnightly collections of the standard 240-litre grey wheelie bins.

Other authorities have all either introduced three-weekly collections – or moved to 140-litre versions of the general waste (grey) bins, which are 40 per cent smaller than the standard containers.

By not changing bin sizes we don’t have to spend money on replacing all your bins, which is a considerable cost. It’s been reported that Manchester’s switch to slimmer bins, for example, will cost them around £1.8m.

We’ve also looked closely at how three-weekly collections are working in other areas.

Bury were the first to introduce them and faced a storm of national headlines about fears of overflowing bins and infestations of rats and insects.

In the first year of the new scheme thousands of tonnes of general waste – a drop of 16 per cent – were no longer sent to landfill.  Bury’s recycling rate jumped by nine per cent and they saved hundreds of thousands of pounds.

In Oldham we estimate we can increase our recycling rate by 12 per cent through these changes which – over the next two years – would save us up to £3 million during a time when we need to find £37 million in savings.

I’ve heard it said this move will lead to a more flytipping here, and I understand that concern.

3WK1However, our experience with flytipping – as detailed in my blog two weeks ago – is that the majority of it isn’t down to selfish residents. It’s lazy trade waste discarded to avoid costs/responsibility, and bad landlords dumping items left by departed tenants.

The new collection regime will be a simpler one.

Grey bins for general rubbish will be collected one week. Blue bins for paper and card the week after, and then brown bins for glass, plastic and tins in the third week.

We’ll also continue collecting all garden and food waste on a weekly basis. That’s to stop the potential for bad smells and flies/insects, especially during the summer.

Households with extra waste they cannot recycle could be entitled to an extra grey bin and they should contact us to discuss the options. And we’re also offering – free – any extra blue, brown and green recycling bins you need, or upgrades to bigger recycling bins if you have the smaller ones.

Before the new system starts I’ve been very clear that we must contact every resident with information packs that explain your options and help with the changes.

Those will include new collection calendars, plus information about how to recycle more effectively. I’m sure the Stretton household isn’t alone in having had many debates about what can and can not be recycled, and exactly how(!).

You can read about the new arrangements on our website at www.oldham.gov.uk/waste or find out more by calling 0161 770 6644.

Rubbish HouseChange brings challenges and I can moan as much as the next person when asked to do something a different way after years of habit.

But we also know doing things differently is our best chance to help find the savings we need to provide good services here.

For now all I ask is that you give the new arrangements ‘a go’ as others have elsewhere.

Please do ‘your bit’ and get behind our mission to recycle as much as we possibly can.

‘Our bit’ is a pledge to monitor this scheme.

We will test how it is working on an ongoing basis and, if something is wrong, we will try to fix it.

Together we can make this work for Oldham.

Jean

3WK4

Flytipping: The fight goes on

flytipNEWFLYTIPPING IS the scourge of our communities – it’s bad for people and places.

The photographs you can see on this page are of the thoroughly-depressing scene that I visited last week.

Although I am Council Leader, I remain a ward member and am still always there to look after Hollinwood matters alongside my colleagues, Councillors Steve Williams and Brian Ames.

A local resident came to see me and told me about this carnage, just behind the cemetery off Limeside Road, last Friday afternoon.

When I got there I was shocked at the scale of the mess. A picture says a thousand words and, honestly, how do people look at themselves in the mirror after doing something like this?

I’m told it seems to have happened between 9.30am and 3.30pm last Wednesday – so it was in broad daylight and utterly shameless.

I rolled my sleeves up and started to sift through the mess on the site.

There was what looks like removed render and other builders’ rubble and lots of bags – including some which contained what appeared to be stripped wallpaper.

NEW4The way it was all strewn along the floor in a trail (pictured) suggests it was on the back of a flatbed truck. They probably just dropped the guard at the back and then drove off at speed to dump it.

The contents this time appear to be trade waste but we also often find flytipping to be the result of another eviction by a rogue landlord. Either way, there’s simply no excuse.

In and amongst the filth and debris I finally located what I was hoping to find: tell-tale signs of where the rubbish might have originated from.

There was a letter and a slip containing two separate addresses of people with the same surname. Coincidence? Time – and our investigation – will tell.

I photographed these and reported everything to council officers who then swung into action and got on investigating the matter.

Our environmental services and enforcement staff do a great job in cleaning up scenes like this on a regular basis but it’s a thankless and disheartening task.

They also work very hard to find the people responsible by looking for evidence of the original owner of the dumped items.

In May this year all local authorities were given greater powers to tackle flytipping crime by now being able to issue penalty notices of between £150 and £400 to those caught in the act of dumping anything from old fridges or sofas to garden waste or rubble.

The maximum fine for dumping waste has also been bumped up to £3m for companies and up to £95,000 for individuals.

Even low-level offenders could face a bill of up to £10,000 and three years in jail.

Crime like this – and that’s exactly what it is – costs our economy and you, the Council Taxpayer, millions of pounds each year.

It also undermines legitimate business, and poses serious risks to the environment because it doesn’t just blight the area, it attracts vermin and is a health hazard.

For me, actions speak louder than words.

If you flytip it speaks volumes about you: about your outlook and attitude to society.

Dumping your waste by the road, whether that’s in an alleyway, the countryside or a random industrial estate, is about as selfish as you can get.

NEW2That’s why Oldham Council will have absolutely no qualms about using those new powers to punish anyone caught doing this.

These ‘on the spot’ fixed penalty notices could also save us time and money in punishing offenders as they are a much quicker alternative to prosecuting through the courts.

We’ll also continue to prosecute whenever we have sufficient evidence – and continue working closely with neighbouring authorities to jointly pursue cases that are happening across our borders.

The money we spend on clearing up mess like this could be saved and spent on other vital services that people rely on. In the current financial climate this simply cannot continue.

We rely on the public’s help in reporting flytipping and helping us to identify the people responsible.

Please do your bit and let us know whenever you spot flytipping – or have information about it – by calling us on 0161 770 2244 or reporting it online here.

To end on a much happier note this week, I just want to say congratulations to Carolyn Wilkins.

CWOBEOur Chief Executive was awarded the OBE in the Queen’s 90th Birthday Honours List last weekend and it was fully deserved.

It’s an accolade that highlights her brilliant work and long-standing service to Local Government and Public Service Reform.

It’s also yet another positive reflection on the way that people are starting to recognise the great progress that is being made here in Oldham.

I’m very proud to work alongside Carolyn and also to be able to consider her as a valued friend.

I’m sure all who know her across and beyond our borough will join me in congratulating her on this news.

Jean