Male violence towards women – are we taking it seriously enough?

crime_scene_tapeYOU WILL have seen in recent weeks that the news has been awash with allegations of sexual misconduct and inappropriate behaviour.
 
In most of these news stories the high profile of the alleged perpetrators – and in some cases, of the victims – has tended be the focus.

Whilst that is understandable to an extent, there is also a danger that the personalities involved become a distraction from the wider horror of what we are actually talking about here: an abuse of power that can go to even deeper and darker levels of control and violence.
 
I was pondering this at the meeting of the Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA) last Friday where all GM leaders and their deputies showed support for The White Ribbon Campaign, which is a part of a global movement to put a stop to male violence against women and girls. 

GMCAThis year part of that campaign has been to look for male role models to take a stand and act on behaviours that can ultimately become something far worse. It makes a simple pledge to “
Never commit, excuse or stay silent about male violence towards women.”
 

The hope is that by recognizing and standing up against any form of gender-based violence against women we can effect a shift in attitude that helps prevent all kinds of violence against women and helps to reduce the escalation of such behaviours in abusive relationships to the point where women are killed.

 
When a woman is killed by an abusive partner or former partner it is often reported and seen as being an isolated incident. But unfortunately that couldn’t be further from the truth.

I did some research into the issue of male violence against women. What I found was truly shocking.

The most recent statistics I could find – by The Femicide Census – cites a total of 936 women killed by men in England and Wales over a six-year period from 2009 to 2015.
 
Horrifically – and at least one aspect that TV dramas do tend to get right – most of these deaths, 598 women or 64 per cent, are at the hands of current or ex-partners and a further 75 deaths, 8 per cent, are by their sons.
 
That makes for chilling reading.
 
What’s deeply worrying though is that many of the killings in this report actually have a lot in common.
 
The report points out that “too many of them followed a similar pattern of violence and were premeditated. Many were committed in similar settings, similar weapons were used, and similar relationships existed between the perpetrators and the victims.”

The report also found women are at the most significant risk of deadly violence after separating from an abusive partner. Around three-quarters of women killed at the hands of their ex-partner or former spouse died within 12 months of that separation.
I’m also concerned not enough is being done to support victims. 

Women’s Aid, a charity, last week obtained data it says shows that around 200 women and children fleeing 
domestic abuse are turned away from refuges every day in England. They warn that the government plans to place councils like ourselves in charge of funding for emergency accommodation will only intensify the pressures and push things towards breaking point.

Women talk to other women about these issues.  But not enough men are talking about this with their friends, colleagues and staff. 
white-ribbon
Surely the time has come now for a new level of commitment across the board. We need to ensure domestic violence victims get the full support they need from police, refuges and local councils – and that we also have a culture where it is the norm for anyone and everyone to speak up against sexual and domestic violence. If you wish to sign the pledge you can do so here.
 

Whilst the White Ribbon Campaign – which started on November 25 and lasts for 16 days – focuses on male violence against women, it is equally important to note that domestic violence can also be perpetrated by women against men and in same-sex relationships.I

f you are an Oldham resident and are affected by any of these issues you can find out more about the local help available here on the Oldham Council website. 

Jean

Integrating health and social care – What really matters

asburnhamUSEIT WAS great to welcome Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester, to Oldham this week.

He came to hear Oldham Council, the Oldham Clinical Commissioning Group and other partners explaining what we’re doing to integrate our health and social care work into one system.

Now I know this stuff does not sound immediately exciting – and it doesn’t make big media headlines – but it’s vitally important, so bear with me…

I know a lot of the health sector can seem inaccessible to the public and filled with confusing acronyms and jargon, which I will avoid here.

The key point about this integration work is simple: it’s all about the quality and effectiveness of the result for the patient.

When we need to access care we probably don’t care who’s responsible for providing the service, or who controls the budget. Why would we?

What matters is the right help being there for us at the right time in the right place, and that it is effective.

Success will mean better prevention and health outcomes for patients – and hence reduced costs and less strain on the public purse, enabling more money to be available to invest in the health of our population.

 

greater-manchester-devolutionThat’s why we are all focussed on this work. This integration of health and social care is a great opportunity from devolution – and its ‘win win’ for all if we get it right.

Like all members of the GM City Region, Oldham now has a Locality Plan under which all partners are working together to transform our social and health care system into a new model that breaks down the old silos at every level.

This is also about aligning care to wider public services like education, skills, work and housing to create a system that is financially balanced and sustainable.

One great example of this is housing where Oldham Council, Oldham CCG and the Oldham Housing Investment Partnership broke the mould in coming together to fund Warm Homes Oldham in 2013.

This scheme offers measures like installing insulation and more efficient boilers, assistance with tariff switching, accessing benefits, using heating systems better and clearing debt with energy companies.

The health problems associated with badly heated homes are those usually suffered by older people and associated with cold weather, like strokes, and conditions affecting children, like asthma. But there are also mental health issues linked to social isolation caused by a reluctance to invite friends and family into a cold home.

warmhomesoldhamWarm Homes Oldham has now lifted more than 4,000 local people out of fuel poverty, eradicating many health problems and producing significant savings on reduced hospital admissions and mental health.

Andy Burnham expressed his concern to us that the link between housing and health outcomes appears to have been under-recognised elsewhere. He was suitably impressed with this scheme and wants to come back to learn more about a scheme he says is just one showing how Oldham is “moving further and faster” than many others on integration.

Another area of clear agreement was our focus on what’s known as social prescribing; an approach where local health practitioners are encouraged to go beyond the simple default of prescribing pills to address problems.

Often when people present to their GP, nurses or other primary care professionals, their problems are more complex and deeper-seated than simply the immediate ailment…

It means, for example, a patient could be encouraged to join a local exercise class or group to address both weight and health issues at the same time as allowing them to make more social connections. This approach can be much more effective for the person, addressing their social, emotional and practical needs, and can also have the added benefit of reducing the use of NHS services.

Andy’s visit was inspiring and the huge collective commitment to get this agenda right in Oldham – with a new system focussed on the person and the place, rather than ‘one size fits all’ – was self-evident.

A couple more important things to mention this week…

Firstly, we have now announced dates and venues for the public consultation on our Oldham Town Centre Masterplan. We’re taking this across the borough in a mini-roadshow where you can view the proposals, then ask questions and submit comments. Please do #yourbit and find your local ‘drop in’ session here.

strictly-kershaws-2017_Facebook_and_webAnd finally I’m just two more practice sessions away from my dancing debut at Strictly Kershaw’s on Friday, October 20.

It’s been great fun to do this but the serious side is that Dr Kershaw’s Hospice needs to raise a staggering £8,000 daily to keep providing their invaluable services for free.

Many thanks to friends and colleagues who have already made donations – and for those who would still like to do so, please visit my JustGiving page and sponsor my dancing efforts here.

Jean