School places: A primary and secondary concern

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NATIONAL OFFER DAY: Secondary School decision is an important milestone for every child 

YESTERDAY was an important day for thousands of parents and children across Oldham.

‘National Offer Day’, as it is now known, is when mums and dads find out which school their child will be starting their secondary education at next September.

In our borough, like everywhere else, we’ve seen a significant increase in the numbers of school age children needing places in recent years.

We take our responsibility to ensure that each child gets a school place very seriously, but it is no easy task.

Putting aside the reality that it is never possible to grant every parent’s preference, this legal duty (as the cross-party Local Government Association has warned this week) could soon become “undeliverable” in many areas.

Significant population growth means many secondary schools are now already at or above capacity nationwide.

Last year local authorities had to provide around 2.75m secondary school places, but that is set to rise to 3.28m by 2024. These are huge numbers and pressures.

Under the Government’s rules, all new schools to help cope with this demand must be “free schools”, created outside of local authority control.

And – to be clear – we are fully committed to working with Vicky Beer, the Regional Schools Commissioner for Lancashire and West Yorkshire, to help to find good quality local sponsors for new schools in our area.

But I also agree with the LGA’s call for councils themselves to be able to open new schools, and to require academies to expand to meet local demand, where necessary.

There are now fewer and fewer schools under the direct control of councils.  It’s surely common sense that local authorities are well placed to act to ensure school places can be created on time – and in the right places. If we are to be tasked with ensuring sufficient school places we need to have more flexibility and influence in the system to have any realistic prospect of delivering that capacity.

Here in Oldham we’ve been seeing a significant increase in demand for places for some time and we have taken the necessary actions.

First, we put a better forecasting method in place looking at all available data on births, housing and new arrivals so we can plan ahead.

Secondly, we got on with an expansion programme to provide extra capacity. That includes plans to boost primary places with a new three-form entry school on the former Grange School site, plus the expansion of places in Failsworth, Hollinwood and Lees.

Last week we also saw planning approval granted for a new Saddleworth School that will increase pupil numbers from 1,350 to 1,500 – and plans are also about to go out to statutory consultation to double the capacity at Greenfield primary with a new build two-form entry school.

So, how have we done this year with the provision of secondary school places?

Out of 3,468 applications received some 2,773 (80 per cent) of applicants got their first-choice school preference and, in total, 93 per cent of all applicants got one of their first three (from six) choices.

These figures are not unusual and pretty static as a trend. The number of parents applying for certain local secondary schools as their first choice exceeds the number of pupils they can take every year.

I’ve said from the outset that the education and skills offer here in the borough is a key focus for my leadership, and every bit as vital to our future as physical regeneration.

So I was interested this week when Michael Wilshaw, Ofsted’s chief inspector of schools, warned Greater Manchester that the region’s poor performing secondaries could “choke” the Northern Powerhouse vision.

I do hope that this was at least a recognition that local authorities need to have a strong role in school improvement, whatever the type of school, because we actually have less influence than ever before.

This is not about councils wanting to directly control academies or free schools, we know that’s not going to happen, but it is about being able to intervene for the good of local communities when schools are not performing.

It cannot be right that all the responsibility for performance can fall upon councils without us having the appropriate powers to act.

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COMMISSION: Estelle Morris chaired the OESC which delivered its vital report in January.

I welcome the calls now for discussion about us having a specific GM Schools Commissioner who would work with a Further Education Commissioner to give more focus on local need and deliver closer coordination between schools and post-16 education.

We are, of course, doing everything we can to meet the challenge of ensuring no child is without a school place in Oldham – but that’s only part of the battle.

The bigger picture is to implement the recommendations of the Oldham Education and Skills Commission report so that every child can not just get a place, but can get one at a ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’ local school – and have the best chance of fulfilling their full potential.

Jean

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